A wave embroidery

This textile is Egyptian, made between the 10th-15th century C.E. It is a base fabric of plain woven linen, embroidered in double running stitch in blue and brown silk.

The textile is 21 cm high by 18.5 cm wide, with three rolled hems. It is likely that this is a decorated end of a larger textile, possibly a sash. The textile is currently in the Ashmolean Museum.

There is not much left of the original embroidery, so I extrapolated what the chart would be completely filled.

ashmoleanwave PDF

Please let me know if there are any issues downloading the PDF.

Advertisements

A digitized copy of the Mishneh Torah

The Bodleian Library has digitized a manuscript of Moses Maimonides‘s authorised work Mishneh Torah which had been written 1168 C.E. to 1178 C.E.

Containing 14 books with almost 1,000 chapters, Maimonides drew on the Mishnah, Tosefta, Midrash and Talmud. Considered one of the greatest works on Jewish theological studies meaning the Mishneh Torah is still studied today.

The manuscript can be seen here.

Another digitized manuscript from the British Library can be read here.

Maimonides other great work is the Guide for the Perplexed, a treatise using Jewish tradition (based on the Talmud etc) and rational philosophy.

This image is a 14th century illumination of the work, while the original was written around 1186 C.E to 1190 C.E. A popular translation done in 1903 is available for download here.

Recommended reading
Maimonides: The Life and World of One of Civilization’s Greatest Minds Joel L. Kraemer. Via Google Books.

Hebrew Scholarship and the Medieval World edited by Nicholas de Lange. Via Google Books.

Hebrew Manuscripts of the Middle Ages by Colette Sirat. Via Google Books.

Sephardic and Mizrahi Jewry: From the Golden Age of Spain to Modern Times edited by Zion Zohar. Via Google Books.

An update to an interpretive embroidery

Late last year I posted an embroidery I did based on an extant textile in the Museum of Fine Arts. The post can be read here.

The Kingdom of Lochac has an embroidery Guild called the Worshipful Company of Broderers. They have Guild competition that are judged at Kingdom events. The most recent event was goldwork. I entered my embroidery and won. I put together my documentation on the extant and reproduction and it is available for download in pdf format.

WCoBgoldworkentry PDF

I had heard from the Museum of Fine Arts about the actual date of the extant textile!

Enjoy.

Coptic dancers?

This textile is Egyptian, 5th-6th century C.E. It is made of wool, tapestry woven but the background fabric of linen has been removed. Two of the figures look like dancers.

Unfortunately there is very little information on the textile on the Cooper Hewitt website. There is a very good high definition picture available though.

A new zigzag embroidery

This textile can be found in the Textile Museum of Canada, Accession number T88.0029. It is thought to have been made the 13th and 15th century C.E. of plain woven linen embroidered in blue or black silk. The textile is 33 cm long and 17.5 cm wide.

Unfortunately the embroidery on the far right of the textile has been destroyed, so is not easily charted. There is evidence of more of the zigzags, but little of anything else. I have charted up the design. It can be downloaded in pdf format. Let me know how it goes!

tmczigzag PDF