A digestive of lemon and quince

Recently I had been given Nawal Nasrallah’s recent translation of 14th century Egyptian cookbook “Treasure Trove of Benefits and Variety at the Table” or Kanz al-fawāʾid fī tanwīʿ al-mawāʾid. I thought to try out a few of the recipes for digestives, although there is only one included in this post. From page 252, recipe number 353, Sharab laymun safarjali (concentrated syrup for lemon-quince drink).

Take a quince, peel it, cut into pieces, and remove the seeds. Boil it in water until it softens and is half cooked. Put the quince aside, and keep the boiling liquid.
Dissolve sugar in the water and boil it until it thickens. Throw in the reserved liquid in which the quince was boiled, and resume boiling it until the syrup is thick enough. Throw in the [boiled] quince and bring it to the boil once or twice, and then remove it. Squeeze one or two lemons on it, and scent it with rosewater.

My redaction-
3 quinces (peeled, cored and chopped)
5 cups water
2 & 1/2 cups raw sugar
2 lemons
3 tablespoons rosewater

Boil the water & quince together until tender.

Remove quince, add sugar and a few strips of lemon peel from the lemons. Boil until half reduced.

While reducing liquid, squeeze two lemons and strain to remove pips.

After liquid has reduced, remove peel and return quinces to pot.

After fruit has fallen apart, mash/blitz with blender. Add lemon juice and rosewater. Strain into jars.

Oxymels

God’s wrath is His vinegar, mercy His honey.
These two are the basis of every oxymel.
If vinegar overpowers honey, a remedy is spoiled.
The people of the earth poured vinegar on Noah;
the Ocean of Divine Bounty poured sugar.
The Ocean replenished his sugar,
and overpowered the vinegar of the whole world.

Rumi

An oxymel, known from the time of the ancient Greeks, is a cordial made from wine vinegar, water and sugar/honey. In the Middle East, oxymel is known as sekanjabin. It was considered a medicine, served warm. However, it was also served with ice. I have seen modern recipes that are served with cucumber.

Turmeric & Saffron has modern recipes for sekanjabin.
Cariadoc’s Miscellany has a drinks page.
Non Alcoholic Beverages of the Middle Ages written by HL Rory McGowen.
Cordials- Alcoholic or Non-Alcoholic Beverages written by Kara of Kirriemuir (PDF document).
Medieval Beverages on a Hot Day written by Mistress Euriol of Lothian aka Cassandra Baldassano (PDF document).