Some children’s wool tunics from early Medieval Egypt

copticegypt10thcenttunic This tunic is made from check pattern wool with linen. It is 75.5 cm high and 77 cm wide. The neckline is decorated with rolled wool fabric, which is gathered into a button at the end. The tunic was thought to have been made between 880-990 C.E. It is currently in the Whitworth Art Gallery, Accession number T.9885.

Copticwooltunic10thcent This tunic is made from wool that has been decorated with pattern darning (in brown wool) and appliqued linen bands of geometric design. Thought to have been cut down from an adult tunic, the manufacture dates fall between 800-999 C.E. The tunic is 45.5 cm high and 51 cm wide. It is currently in the Whitworth Art Gallery, Accession number T.8549.

coptic8thcenttunic This woolen tunic has been made from one single piece of wool, folded over with goes inserted on the sides. It is 46 cm high and 48 cm wide. Also thought to have been cut down from an adult’s tunic, the seams have been sewn in blue and red thread with the front and back of the tunic heavily darned with threads of many different colours. The neckline and sleeves have also been decorated with appliqued wool and linen bands. The tunic is currently in the Whitworth Art Gallery, Accession number T.8505.

coptictunic7thcent This red woolen tunic is also made from one single piece of fabric, folded over. There is decorative stitching in orange, yellow, turquoise, and dark blue thread. The neckline and sleeves are also decorated with appliqued wool and linen bands with geometric patterns. The tunic is 76.5 cm high and 61 cm wide. The tunic is currently in the Whitworth Art Gallery, Accession number T.8377.

Recommended reading
Weaving in Coptic Egypt. Via the California Academy of Sciences.

Coptic dress in Egypt: the social life of Medieval cloth by Bazinet, M. In the Textile Society of America Proceedings 1992. PDF document.

Coptic Tunics in the Metropolitan Museum of Art by Dimand, M.S. JStor article.

Late Coptic Embroideries by Shepherd, Dorothy G. JStor article.

The Evolution of Two Traditional Coptic Tape Patterns: Further Observations on the Classification of Coptic Textiles by Thompson, Deborah. JStor article.

A pattern darned textile

ashmoleanslantedpatterndarning This textile was thought to have been made in Egypt between the 10th and 15th century C.E. It is linen embroidered in dark blue silk in a pattern darning stitch. The textile is 29 cm by 33 cm, with three hemmed sides (in flax) and one side the selvedge.

The design has four prominent parallel lines, which has the design running in one direction, as grouped by the two sides. The broken parallel lines (that look as though they run behind the first four lines) have the design reversing.

The textile can be seen at the Ashmolean Museum.

I have charted the design. If you are concerned over the directions of the design please check out the extant on the above link!

ashmoleanslantingpatterndarning PDF

Let me know how the chart works!

A new long arm cross stitch embroidery

ashmoleantriangle This embroidery was made in Egypt between the 10th-15th century. It is plain weave linen embroidered with silk in long armed cross stitch. The far left of the fabric is a rolled hem. The embroidery itself is only 2 cm wide, while the whole piece is 20.5 cm by 17.3 cm.
ashmoleantriangledetail
The textile is currently in the Ashmolean Museum.

I have charted up the design in pdf format.

ashmoleantriangle (PDF)

Have fun!

A possible sleeve embroidery

ashmoleanchevron This textile was made in Egypt between the 10th and 15th century. It is linen embroidered in dark blue silk. On the left of the textile is a rolled hem sewn in flax. The size of the textile is 11cm by 5 cm. It is currently in the Ashmolean Museum.

I have charted up the design and it is available for download in pdf format.

ashmoleanchevron (PDF)

I would love to see pictures!

The second possible tunic embroidery

textilecanada1 This textile was made in Egypt between the 14th and 15th century. It is linen embroidered with red and blue silk, with a flat felled seam. It is 15.3 cm long and 49.6 cm wide. It is currently in the Textile Museum of Canada.

The textile is embroidered in double running stitch and pattern darning. I have charted up the design. It is available in pdf format.

textilemusofcantunic (pdf)

Good Luck!

A textile with a diagonal grid embroidery

ashmoleandiagonalgrid This textile was thought to have been made between the 10th-15th century C.E. in Egypt. It is 23 long and 20 cm wide. The textile is linen embroidered with blue silk in a double running stitch. There is a visible rolled hem on the bottom left of the textile, which had been sewn with flax.

The textile is made up of two pieces of linen sewn together using flax in a flat seam. The textile is currently in the Ashmolean Museum.

I have charted up the embroidery for use. It is in pdf format.

ashmoleandiagonalgrid (pdf)

Three Coptic tunics and a hat

coptnecklinetextilemeseum This textile is 64 cm long and 114 cm wide. It is made of plain woven linen with wool tapestry weave inserts. It was made by Coptic Egyptians between the 9th and 12th centuries C.E. It is currently in the Textile Museum of Canada. There is a zoom view available on the page.

coptictunic1textilemuseum This textile is 105 cm long and 122 cm wide. It is wool, with tapestry woven inserts of bird decorations and thought to have been made between the 6th and 7th centuries. The bottoms of the tunic is fringed. The tunic is in the Textile Museum of Canada. The tunic has a zoom view available on the page.

coptictunic2textilemueum This tunic is 76.7 cm long and 112.3 cm wide. It is made of plain woven linen, with wool tapestry woven inserts and appliqué. It was thought to have been made between the 7th and 9th centuries. The tunic is currently in the Textile Museum of Canada. There is a zoom view available on the page.

coptichattextilemuseum This hat is 13.3 cm long and 16.6 cm wide with a circumference of 44.5 cm at the bottom of the hat. It is made of plain woven linen between the 5th and 9th centuries. The bottom was thought to have ear flaps. It is currently in the Textile Museum of Canada. There is a zoom view of the hat on the page.