A new pattern darning chart

ashmoleancontinuouss This textile was thought to have been made between the 10th and 15th centuries in Egypt. It is a kerchief or square cover that is linen embroidered in blue and brown silk. The textile is 28.5 by 26 cm, embroidered in eight pattern darning bands with a width of 1 cm. The kerchief is currently in the Ashmolean Museum.

I have charted up the design. It is in pdf format-
ashmoleancontinuouss PDF

I also used the design in an embroidery competition in my Kingdom. I will edit the post later to add a picture, as I currently don’t have one. I will also upload a pdf of my documentation-
WCob3 PDF

Let me know how you find the chart!

Some children’s wool tunics from early Medieval Egypt

copticegypt10thcenttunic This tunic is made from check pattern wool with linen. It is 75.5 cm high and 77 cm wide. The neckline is decorated with rolled wool fabric, which is gathered into a button at the end. The tunic was thought to have been made between 880-990 C.E. It is currently in the Whitworth Art Gallery, Accession number T.9885.

Copticwooltunic10thcent This tunic is made from wool that has been decorated with pattern darning (in brown wool) and appliqued linen bands of geometric design. Thought to have been cut down from an adult tunic, the manufacture dates fall between 800-999 C.E. The tunic is 45.5 cm high and 51 cm wide. It is currently in the Whitworth Art Gallery, Accession number T.8549.

coptic8thcenttunic This woolen tunic has been made from one single piece of wool, folded over with goes inserted on the sides. It is 46 cm high and 48 cm wide. Also thought to have been cut down from an adult’s tunic, the seams have been sewn in blue and red thread with the front and back of the tunic heavily darned with threads of many different colours. The neckline and sleeves have also been decorated with appliqued wool and linen bands. The tunic is currently in the Whitworth Art Gallery, Accession number T.8505.

coptictunic7thcent This red woolen tunic is also made from one single piece of fabric, folded over. There is decorative stitching in orange, yellow, turquoise, and dark blue thread. The neckline and sleeves are also decorated with appliqued wool and linen bands with geometric patterns. The tunic is 76.5 cm high and 61 cm wide. The tunic is currently in the Whitworth Art Gallery, Accession number T.8377.

Recommended reading
Weaving in Coptic Egypt. Via the California Academy of Sciences.

Coptic dress in Egypt: the social life of Medieval cloth by Bazinet, M. In the Textile Society of America Proceedings 1992. PDF document.

Coptic Tunics in the Metropolitan Museum of Art by Dimand, M.S. JStor article.

Late Coptic Embroideries by Shepherd, Dorothy G. JStor article.

The Evolution of Two Traditional Coptic Tape Patterns: Further Observations on the Classification of Coptic Textiles by Thompson, Deborah. JStor article.

A pattern darned textile

ashmoleanslantedpatterndarning This textile was thought to have been made in Egypt between the 10th and 15th century C.E. It is linen embroidered in dark blue silk in a pattern darning stitch. The textile is 29 cm by 33 cm, with three hemmed sides (in flax) and one side the selvedge.

The design has four prominent parallel lines, which has the design running in one direction, as grouped by the two sides. The broken parallel lines (that look as though they run behind the first four lines) have the design reversing.

The textile can be seen at the Ashmolean Museum.

I have charted the design. If you are concerned over the directions of the design please check out the extant on the above link!

ashmoleanslantingpatterndarning PDF

Let me know how the chart works!

More Andalusian jewelry

christiesnasrid12thcent These earrings are thought to have been made between the 11th and 12th century in either Nasrid Spain or Iran. They are gold crescents with granulation along the bottom edge. One side of the earring has an inscription (no translation available) and the other an abstract design. The diameter is 1.5 cm. The earrings were sold by Christies for $8,395 (£5,250).

christiesgoldroundel11thcent These earrings were thought to have been made between the 11th and 14th centuries. These are earrings made of gold in a roundel shape. It is made of gold sheet, worked in the inside section into a palmette shape while the outside decorations were also made of convex gold sheet decorated with gold granules. The earrings are 7cm wide. The earrings were sold by Christies for $10,428 (£6,000).

qantaraalmohadearring12thcent This earring was thought to have been made in the 12th century. Made of gold, in filigree and granulation. The size is 5.8 cm. It is in a crescent shape with birds and a tree in abstract. The crescent has an inscription which reads “In the name of God, the Merciful, the Compassionate”. It had been made during the Almohad or Almoravid caliphate. More information can be found on the Qantara website.

nasrid14thcentgoldbeltbuckle The belt buckle was thought to have been made between the 14th and 15th century. Made from gold, enameled with an inscription (no translation available) and decorations of very fine filigree and granulations. It is 9.7 cm long. Information available through Google Cultural Institute or the Museum of Islamic Art, Qatar (item JE.210.2008).

enamellednasrid15thcent This is a collection of five enameled pieces not made from gold but gold gilt. There is also an amulet that had been enameled with the inscription from the Quran CXII. The biggest piece is 3.4 cm and the smallest is 1.8 cm. It was thought that the items came from a horse’s bridle. The items had been sold by Sotheby’s.

My own Persian Cloud Collar research

I have been conducting my own research into Persian cloud collars. My work is very much based on other Scadian’s work.

This is just the beginning- I have found over 100 illuminations of cloud collars but have only included two in the article. Very much a work in progress!

Let me know what you think!

cloudcollararticle PDF

A new long arm cross stitch embroidery

ashmoleantriangle This embroidery was made in Egypt between the 10th-15th century. It is plain weave linen embroidered with silk in long armed cross stitch. The far left of the fabric is a rolled hem. The embroidery itself is only 2 cm wide, while the whole piece is 20.5 cm by 17.3 cm.
ashmoleantriangledetail
The textile is currently in the Ashmolean Museum.

I have charted up the design in pdf format.

ashmoleantriangle (PDF)

Have fun!

A dancer with a Vina

dancerwithavina17thcent This picture is 17th century Persian, although originally found in Turkey. It is a leaf from a manuscript, 11 cm by 19.1 cm. The dancer is holding a vina, which is an Indian instrument. The picture is currently in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Recommended reading about Indian music
Saṅgītaśiromaṇi: A Medieval Handbook of Indian Music edited by Emmie Te Nijenhuis. Via Google Books.

Musical Instruments of the Indian Subcontinent by Allen Roda. Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History.

History of Indian music by P. Sambamoorthy. Via Internet Archive.