A pilgrim’s flask

This flask is made from blue hand blown glass, with a stopper covered in fabric and attached by a cord to the flask’s fabric case.
The flask’s fabric case is made from linen, embroidered with blue flax and done in pulled thread work.
As seen, the stitches also involve a stitch known as a dove’s eye. The bag was also stuffed with vegetable fibres, possibly for insulation. The size (including the bag) is 13.5cm height with 11 width and 1.5 cm depth.

The pilgrim’s flask in currently in the Ashmolean Museum and thought to have been made between 14th and 15th Century C.E.

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A textile with chevrons

This textile was made in Egypt between the 10th-15th century C.E. It is 21.5 cm long and 19 cm wide(the embroidery is 13 cm). It is linen embroidered in blue flax. The textile is in the Ashmolean Museum Accession number EA1984.539.

I have charted it up. It is available for download as a pdf-
ashmoleanzigzag (PDF)
Instead of asking how everyone else finds the chart, I did a handkerchief as a gift to Their Majesties Rowland and Tailltiu.
Have fun!

A homemade sampler

This sampler is one have been working on the last few months. It is based on Mamluk samplers I have charted over the years, which are available for download on the Embroidery charts page.

I had written up documentation, which may be of interest. It is available as a pdf.
WCoBsamplerentry PDF

It was done for a competition for the Worshipful Company of Broderers in the Kingdom of Lochac. For the Lochac Kingdom event of 12th Night, the topic of the competition was working sampler. I won! The item has also been graded as a masterwork.

A wave embroidery

This textile is Egyptian, made between the 10th-15th century C.E. It is a base fabric of plain woven linen, embroidered in double running stitch in blue and brown silk.

The textile is 21 cm high by 18.5 cm wide, with three rolled hems. It is likely that this is a decorated end of a larger textile, possibly a sash. The textile is currently in the Ashmolean Museum.

There is not much left of the original embroidery, so I extrapolated what the chart would be completely filled.

ashmoleanwave PDF

Please let me know if there are any issues downloading the PDF.

An update to an interpretive embroidery

Late last year I posted an embroidery I did based on an extant textile in the Museum of Fine Arts. The post can be read here.

The Kingdom of Lochac has an embroidery Guild called the Worshipful Company of Broderers. They have Guild competition that are judged at Kingdom events. The most recent event was goldwork. I entered my embroidery and won. I put together my documentation on the extant and reproduction and it is available for download in pdf format.

WCoBgoldworkentry PDF

I had heard from the Museum of Fine Arts about the actual date of the extant textile!

Enjoy.

A new zigzag embroidery

This textile can be found in the Textile Museum of Canada, Accession number T88.0029. It is thought to have been made the 13th and 15th century C.E. of plain woven linen embroidered in blue or black silk. The textile is 33 cm long and 17.5 cm wide.

Unfortunately the embroidery on the far right of the textile has been destroyed, so is not easily charted. There is evidence of more of the zigzags, but little of anything else. I have charted up the design. It can be downloaded in pdf format. Let me know how it goes!

tmczigzag PDF

Back for this year!

I am sorry about not posting this year. My husband and I have just stepped up as Baron and Baroness of our group. There was much frantic sewing and organising.

Since this challenge has been overcome, I will provide a new chart on this blog to challenge you!

This textile was made in Egypt, between the 10th-15th century C.E. It is plain woven linen, size 12 cm by 17.5 cm, and embroidered in blue flax. There is a selvedge on the right side of the textile. It can be found in the Ashmolean Museum EA 1984.560

I have charted it up, but the less than whole textile shows that there was another “zigzag” design at the bottom (there is a crescent seen on the bottom left). I am unable to work out if another full zigzag was done, or a repeat on the capping zigzag. I look forward to hearing your opinions on it!

ashmoleanchevronsandtrefoils PDF