A textile in the V&A

This textile was made in Egypt between 1250 and 1500 C.E. It is linen, embroidered with red silk in two distinct patterns. It is 14 cm by 19 cm. There are two rolled hems on the left and right sides. It is thought that it is a possible scarf or girdle. The textile is in the V&A Museum, Accession number 804-1898. The embroidery at the bottom of the textile is almost the same design as a textile in the Ashmolean, which can be read about in a previous post “A new embroidery chart with chevrons and diamond shapes”.

I have charted the top design. It is available as a pdf.
vandazigzags PDF

Let me know how you find it!

A pilgrim’s flask

This flask is made from blue hand blown glass, with a stopper covered in fabric and attached by a cord to the flask’s fabric case.
The flask’s fabric case is made from linen, embroidered with blue flax and done in pulled thread work.
As seen, the stitches also involve a stitch known as a dove’s eye. The bag was also stuffed with vegetable fibres, possibly for insulation. The size (including the bag) is 13.5cm height with 11 width and 1.5 cm depth.

The pilgrim’s flask in currently in the Ashmolean Museum and thought to have been made between 14th and 15th Century C.E.

A textile with chevrons

This textile was made in Egypt between the 10th-15th century C.E. It is 21.5 cm long and 19 cm wide(the embroidery is 13 cm). It is linen embroidered in blue flax. The textile is in the Ashmolean Museum Accession number EA1984.539.

I have charted it up. It is available for download as a pdf-
ashmoleanzigzag (PDF)
Instead of asking how everyone else finds the chart, I did a handkerchief as a gift to Their Majesties Rowland and Tailltiu.
Have fun!

Aruzziyya

In my Barony a Cooks’ Guild meeting was held. Having just gotten Nawal Nasrallah’s most recent book Treasure Trove of Benefits and Variety at the Table (available from Brill Publishing) I thought to try a recipe that had caught my eye.

In the “miscellany of dishes” chapter (the largest in the book) recipe 85 reads-

You need meat, rice, black pepper, coriander, and dill (shabath).
Boil the meat, [take it out of the broth] and brown it. Pound the fat solids attached to it, and return them to the meat.
Pound black pepper and coriander with some meat and a bit of rice, and shape into meatballs (mudaqqaqa). After the rest of the meat brown [as mentioned above], pour it’s broth [back] on it. Add the meatballs, and let them cook until done.
Wash some rice, and add it to the pot along with a bit of dill, [and let them cook] and simmer gently and serve.

Ingredients-
800g minced beef
Bunch of coriander and dill
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon dried and ground coriander
1 & 1/4 cups Basmati rice
1 litre beef stock
1 egg
1 tablespoon ghee
1 table spoon olive oil

Method-
Mix minced beef, chopped coriander and dill (roughly one cup), black pepper and ground coriander in a large bowl with the egg and 1/4 cup rice. Roll into meatballs.
Heat oil and ghee in pressure cooker pot then fry the meatballs until brown. Remove from pot. Place washed rice in oil for 1 minute, stirring. Add stock and 1 tablespoon fresh chopped dill, then place meatballs back. Once simmering, put lid on & pressure cook for 15 minutes. Once finished, stir and serve.

Pros and cons-
Needed much more pepper! The ghee was too heavy to make fluffy rice but I was unable to get any sesame oil. Recommend sesame oil if anyone wishes to try. Very easy to do, and doesn’t need a pressure cooker. I just wanted to do something relatively fast. The recipe didn’t have egg mentioned, but I tried to mix it without the egg and it wouldn’t hold together. The rice in the meatballs makes a difference from adding breadcrumbs. Beef was used although most likely to have been lamb. I picked up a packet of mince with a high fat content since the rendered fat is returned to the dish in the recipe. Tasted better the next day!

A homemade sampler

This sampler is one have been working on the last few months. It is based on Mamluk samplers I have charted over the years, which are available for download on the Embroidery charts page.

I had written up documentation, which may be of interest. It is available as a pdf.
WCoBsamplerentry PDF

It was done for a competition for the Worshipful Company of Broderers in the Kingdom of Lochac. For the Lochac Kingdom event of 12th Night, the topic of the competition was working sampler. I won! The item has also been graded as a masterwork.

A wave embroidery

This textile is Egyptian, made between the 10th-15th century C.E. It is a base fabric of plain woven linen, embroidered in double running stitch in blue and brown silk.

The textile is 21 cm high by 18.5 cm wide, with three rolled hems. It is likely that this is a decorated end of a larger textile, possibly a sash. The textile is currently in the Ashmolean Museum.

There is not much left of the original embroidery, so I extrapolated what the chart would be completely filled.

ashmoleanwave PDF

Please let me know if there are any issues downloading the PDF.

A new zigzag embroidery

This textile can be found in the Textile Museum of Canada, Accession number T88.0029. It is thought to have been made the 13th and 15th century C.E. of plain woven linen embroidered in blue or black silk. The textile is 33 cm long and 17.5 cm wide.

Unfortunately the embroidery on the far right of the textile has been destroyed, so is not easily charted. There is evidence of more of the zigzags, but little of anything else. I have charted up the design. It can be downloaded in pdf format. Let me know how it goes!

tmczigzag PDF