Goldwork from 10th-12th century Egypt and Syria

fatimidgoldearrings10thcent These earring were thought to have been made between the 10th and 11th century in either Egypt or Syria. At the time the area was ruled by the Fatimid dynasty. The earrings are a combination of sheet, wire, filigree, and granulation work. The first earring is 6.4 cm high and 3.3 cm wide; the second is 6.7 cm high and 3.3 cm wide. The earrings are currently in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

fatimidgoldring11thcent This ring was thought to have been made in the 11th century in either Fatimid ruled Egypt or Syria. It is made of gold in sheets, decorated with filigree and granulation. The ring is 2.7 cm high and 2.5 cm wide. The diametre is 1.4 cm and the weight of the ring is 5.7 grams. The ring is currently in the Metropolitan Museum of Art where there are more pictures to see.

fatimidgoldpendant11thcent This pendant was also thought to have been made in the 11th century Egypt. It is a rare enamelled piece, made from gold sheet, decorated with filigree, wire work, and inset with turquoise. The enamel itself was later glued into place after the design had been finished. The pendant is 4.5 cm high and 3.5 cm wide. The pendant is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art where there are many other pictures, including one of the back.

ayyubidgoldbelt12thcent This gold belt buckle was thought to have been made in 12th century Syria, which at the time was ruled by the Ayyubid dynasty. It is 10cm long, made of twin plates to cover the end of the leather. The gold buckle has extruded knobs and bosses while the front plate is decorated with a cartouche of a falcon attacking a bird. It was sold by Christies for £17,250 (or $28,683).

Recommended reading

Near Eastern Jewelry: A Picture Book by Dimand, M. S. and H. E. McAllister. Available for download via the Met or read online through Google Books.

Mamluk jewelry: influences and echoes by Jenkins, M. As published in Muqarnas: An Annual on Islamic Art and Architecture, Vol 3.

Islamic Jewelry in The Metropolitan Museum of Art by Jenkins, M. and Keene, M. Available for download via the Met or read online through Google Books.

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