8th century Persian clothes

This caftan is from the 8th century, from the Caucasus/Persia region. It is 142.2 cm, made from silk, linen and fur. The caftan has been semi-reconstructed, as it was only preserved in a small part (from the hem to the neck). The main body was made of fine plain-weave linen, with lambskin as a lining. The decorative strip is of compound twill-woven silk, in stylized rosettes in dark blue, yellow, red, and white on a dark brown ground (much faded). There are slits in the caftan at sides which would have made it easier to ride. The caftan is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This woman’s tunic is also linen with silk decorative cuffs. The dimensions are 121.92 x 180.34 cm. The tunic is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This is a collar of a caftan, made from silk. The measurements are 1.27cm wide and 57.79 cm long. There is very little information on the collar, but it looks like a tapestry weaving. The item is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. These leggings are made of linen (feet section) and silk (leg section). There is the same stylized roundels as the above caftan. The leggings are 80.01 cm long. It is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. These were made of leather, but no animal origin has been given. They are 17.15 x 14.61 cm. The gloves are currently in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Recommended reading
A Man’s Caftan and Leggings from the North Caucasus of the Eighth to Tenth Century: A Genealogical Study by Elfriede R. Knauer. JStor article.
A Man’s Caftan and Leggings from the North Caucasus of the Eighth to Tenth Century: A Conservator’s Report by Nobuko Kajitani. JStor article.

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3 comments on “8th century Persian clothes

  1. Tig says:

    looking at the magnified pic of the silk woven collar, it doesn’t actually look like tapestry weaving. There are very defined blocks of colour, like lego bricks. Looks more like some form of twill woven tablet weaving although possibly a 2 hole that allows for the warp threads to show up as the single white lines between the stacked darker blocks.

    • You are quite right Tig. I was hazarding a guess…

      • Tig says:

        I do wish museums would spend more time noting what techniques are used though. Would make it so much easier for all of us. The 2 hole tablet weaving I mentioned, can be used to create a plain tabby weave, as opposed to a 4 hole warp faced as is usual. However, I’m not a 2 hole expert, I’m also hazarding a guess based on a not totally clear pic. It’d be nice to know so we could attempt reproductions without going to the lengths of hassling the museum staff 😉

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