Jewish Pilgrimage glass

jewbyzoctbottle This is a moulded glass bottle, made between 500-650 C.E. It is octagonal in shape, 9.2 cm by 9.4 cm by 9.4 cm. It is decorated with the Jewish symbols of the menorah, the shofar, an incense shovel and the lulav. The bottle was made in Byzantine ruled Syria and was thought to have been made for Jewish pilgrims going to the Holy Land. The bottle is currently in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

blackoctbottle This bottle also is octagonally shaped but the dimensions are 8.1 cm by 7 cm by 7.7 cm. The bottle also has been decorated with the Jewish symbols of the lulav, menorah, incense shovel and shofar. It was mold-blown glass, made between 578–636 C.E. The bottle is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

jewbyzhexjug This molded glass jug is hexagonal in shape and also decorated with the Jewish symbols mentioned above. The dimensions are 15.7 cm by 7.4 cm by 6.8 cm. The jug is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. All three items were thought to have been made in the one workshop.

Recommended reading
Population, Settlement and Economy in Late Roman and Byzantine Palestine (70-641 AD) by Doron Bar. JStor article.
A Court Jew’s Silver Cup by Vivian B. Mann. Metropolitan Museum Journal.
An Empire’s New Holy Land: The Byzantine Period by S. Thomas Parker. JStor article.
Judaism During the Byzantine Period by Yitzchak Schwartz. The Metropolitan Museum of Art Blog.
Religious Contacts in Byzantine Palestine by Gedaliahu G. Stroumsa. JStor article.

Some Abbasid glassware

abbasidplainglass This bottle is from Abbasid ruled Syria, from the 8th-9th century C.E. It is hand-blown glass, with a tooled pontil. The height is 7.9 cm and the diametre is 6 cm. It is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
decoratedabbasidbottle This glass bottle is from the 7th-8th century C.E. It is hand-blown with a hand tooled pontil and applied decoration. The height is 9.2 cm and diametre is 3.2 cm. It is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
moldedabbasidbottle This is a bottle from the 9th-10th century Iraq or Syria. It is made of green/yellow glass and dark blue glass, blown in two parts and impressed with tongs to make stylized figures of a running animal with long ears and a tail that ends in a palmette-like motif. The two different glasses were fused together in the incalmo technique. The height is 19.1 cm and the diametre is 9.5 cm. It is currently in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
fragmentabbasidcup This is a fragment of a cup, plain glass which had been impressed with tongs. It is 9th century, with a height of 5.1 cm and a diametre of 6.3 cm. The fragment is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Recommended Reading
Glass of the Sultans: Twelve Centuries of Masterworks from the Islamic World by Stefano Carboni & David B. Whitehouse. Via Google Books.
Incised Glass Vessels from the Umayyad and Abbasid-Fatimid Periods at Bet Shean, Israel by Shulamit Hadad. JStor article. Also available for download via the Internet Archive.
The Science and Archaeology of Materials: An investigation of inorganic materials by Julian Henderson. Via Google Books.
Some Problems in Early Islamic Glass by Margaret O’Hea. Via Academia.edu.

There are many other pieces of glassware at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.