More bowls from the South Australian exhibit

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA This bowl is from 10th-11th century Iran. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA This is made of earthenware with under-glaze slip decorations of the zodiac sign of Capricorn.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA This bowl is also from the 10th-11th century Iran. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Made from earthenware, it has under-glaze slip decoration of the zodiac sign Leo. The kiln firing caused part of the glaze to melt & blur.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA This bowl was made in the 13th century in central Iran. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA It is made from stone paste earthenware, with under-glaze decorations of birds and scroll work.

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The bowl made made between the 10th-11th century in Iran. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA It is made from stone paste earthenware with lustre glaze decorations of calligraphy and scrolled flowers.

More ceramics from the South Australian exhibit

More thanks go to Mistress ffride wlffsdotter, who has been most gently encouraging me to post these beautiful pictures she took.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA This bowl is from 13th-14th century Iran.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA It is stone paste earthenware with lustre decoration of three people in a garden. It is part of the Gallery’s permanent collection. The size of the bowl is 22.4 cm.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA This bowl is also 13th century from Iran. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA The bowl is 21.4 cm, stone paste earthenware with underglaze and lustre decorations of the story of Bahram Gur. The bowl is in the permanent collection of the Gallery.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA This bowl is from 10th century Iran. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA The bowl is earthenware with underglaze slip decorations of a “cosmic prince” a zodiac symbol of the sun.

An exhibit in South Australia

The Art Gallery of South Australia recently held an exhibit called Paradise on Earth: Flowers in the Art of Islam.

I would like to thank Mistress ffride wlffsdotter for the use of her photos and her support of the Guild!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA This dish is an Ottoman 16th century iznik.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA The decoration is of a hunting dog and rabbit in an earthenware glaze.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA This dish is also 16th century Ottoman iznik.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA The decorations are of tulips and poppies.

Iznik pottery

Iznik ceramics, so well known from the Ottoman Empire, came from the town of İznik (or Nicaea in Greek). The town developed earthenware pottery with underglaze decoration in the late 14th century, following the style laid out by Seljuq pottery. However, the style developed into quality fritware, with Chinese blue and white decorations under a clear lead glaze. Over time the styles became less formal and more flowing, including flowers such as chrysanthemums and tulips. Iznik pottery out of Iznik lasted to the mid 17th century but some copies are usually sold for tourists.This bottle base is an early style and dated to 1510C.E. It is 27.4cm high, a drop shape with a short foot, decorated with blue floral sprays and white lattice work. Sold by Christies for £121,250 ($185,998).This iznik jug is 24.5cm high, baluster shaped with single loop handle. Decorations are red flowers with blue saz leaves. Thought to be from 1560C.E. Sold by Christies for £30,000 ($46,020).This dish is thought to be from 1590C.E. It has a 30.9cm diametre, decorated with blue, red, green and black around a central floral medallion. It was sold by Christies for £15,000 ($23,010).This tankard is dated to 1610C.E. It is 20.2cm high, decorated with saz leaves and tulips. The handle has been restored, but this shape is very common. It was sold by Christies for £8,125 ($12,464).This iznik tile is dated to 1580 C.E. It is 25.3cm square, with decorations of a central floral medallion surrounded by scrolls of red and green, with black outline on a white background. Sold by Christies for £5,378 ($7,781). The Christies’ website has zoom function on almost all of the pictures.
Bibliography
Dating Ottoman Turkish Works in the Saz Style by Walter B. Denny. JStor article.
The Technology of Fifteenth Century Turkish Tiles: An Interim Statement on the Origins of the Iznik Industry by J. Henderson and J. Raby. JStor article.
From International Timurid to Ottoman: A Change of Taste in Sixteenth-Century Ceramic Tiles by Gülru Necipoğlu. JStor article.
A Group of Ottoman Pottery in the Godman Bequest by Michael Rogers. JStor article.
Ottoman Ceramics in European Contexts by Fi̇li̇z Yeni̇şehi̇rli̇oǧlu.

I would also recommend finding books on iznik pottery, as there are no books available to read through Google Books.