A fifth embroidered tunic

ashmoleantunic5 This textile was thought to have been made between the 10th-15th century in Egypt. It is made of linen, embroidered in blue cotton or wool. The textile is 22.5 cm by 29.5 cm with a selvage on the left. The textile is in the Ashmolean Museum.

I have charted up the diagonal double running design which is inside the inner squares.
ashmoleantunic5 The document is available for download as a pdf.
ashmoleantunic5 PDF

Let me know how the embroidery goes!

A fourth possible shirt embroidery

ashmoleantreesandtiraz This textile was thought to have been made between the 10th and 15th centuries C.E. in Egypt. It is linen, embroidered in blue silk in double running stitch. The size of the textile is 26.5 cm by 9.5 cm. In the middle of the textile there is a roll and fell seam sewn in flax, possibly from a shirt. The tiraz is in Kufic script, which translates as “blessing”.

The textile is currently in the Ashmolean Museum.

I have charted up the design & it is available for download as a pdf document.

ashmoleantreesandtiraz (pdf)

I would love to see any garb with this design!

A third possible tunic embroidery

ashmoleantunic2 This textile is Egyptian, made between the 10th and 15th century. It is 47 cm long and 5 cm wide. It is linen embroidered with tree designs in blue silk and a hem in brown silk. There are also two seams, one flat felled in the textile. It is currently in the Ashmolean Museum.

I have charted up the tree design. It is available in pdf format.
ashmoleantunic2 (pdf)

More tunic inspiration!

The second possible tunic embroidery

textilecanada1 This textile was made in Egypt between the 14th and 15th century. It is linen embroidered with red and blue silk, with a flat felled seam. It is 15.3 cm long and 49.6 cm wide. It is currently in the Textile Museum of Canada.

The textile is embroidered in double running stitch and pattern darning. I have charted up the design. It is available in pdf format.

textilemusofcantunic (pdf)

Good Luck!

The first possible tunic embroidery

ashmoleantunic1 This textile was made between the 10th-15th centuries in Egypt. It is linen embroidered with brown silk with flax thread in the seams. The size is 26 cm long and 12 cm wide. It is currently in the Ashmolean Museum.

I have charted up the design. It is available in pdf format.

ashmoleantunic1 (pdf)

Have fun!

A textile with a diagonal grid embroidery

ashmoleandiagonalgrid This textile was thought to have been made between the 10th-15th century C.E. in Egypt. It is 23 long and 20 cm wide. The textile is linen embroidered with blue silk in a double running stitch. There is a visible rolled hem on the bottom left of the textile, which had been sewn with flax.

The textile is made up of two pieces of linen sewn together using flax in a flat seam. The textile is currently in the Ashmolean Museum.

I have charted up the embroidery for use. It is in pdf format.

ashmoleandiagonalgrid (pdf)

Three Coptic tunics and a hat

coptnecklinetextilemeseum This textile is 64 cm long and 114 cm wide. It is made of plain woven linen with wool tapestry weave inserts. It was made by Coptic Egyptians between the 9th and 12th centuries C.E. It is currently in the Textile Museum of Canada. There is a zoom view available on the page.

coptictunic1textilemuseum This textile is 105 cm long and 122 cm wide. It is wool, with tapestry woven inserts of bird decorations and thought to have been made between the 6th and 7th centuries. The bottoms of the tunic is fringed. The tunic is in the Textile Museum of Canada. The tunic has a zoom view available on the page.

coptictunic2textilemueum This tunic is 76.7 cm long and 112.3 cm wide. It is made of plain woven linen, with wool tapestry woven inserts and appliqué. It was thought to have been made between the 7th and 9th centuries. The tunic is currently in the Textile Museum of Canada. There is a zoom view available on the page.

coptichattextilemuseum This hat is 13.3 cm long and 16.6 cm wide with a circumference of 44.5 cm at the bottom of the hat. It is made of plain woven linen between the 5th and 9th centuries. The bottom was thought to have ear flaps. It is currently in the Textile Museum of Canada. There is a zoom view of the hat on the page.